Wilkie Martin - Surviving Publication


Author of the unhuman series of addictive comedy cozy mysteries set in the Cotswolds. This documents my encounters with publishing and includes things I hope will be useful later. It also covers some local writing competitions and reviews some writing events.

Monday, 7 October 2013

What's in the Blood?

When someone said that Inspector Hobbes and the Blood, the title of my first book in the unhuman series of fast-paced, comedy crime fantasies, sounds rather gruesome I thought it was time for some explanation of how blood sits within a comedy book. It depends on how blood is interpreted, for it can mean many things.

  • Blood is vital for life. Andy, my hapless narrator, was living a sort of half-life before meeting Inspector Hobbes;  Hobbes became a vital force, almost like a blood transfusion, to bring Andy back to full life.
  • Blood can be used in the sense of 'it's in the blood', meaning a certain feature, or set of behaviours, regarded as part of someone's nature or inherited characteristics. Since one of the themes of the book is nature vs nurture, how much of an individual's behaviour is genetic, and how much comes from upbringing, this sense seemed appropriate. Inspector Hobbes, although having a fundamentally savage nature, remains civilized, at least for most of the time. Andy, on the other hand, starts to learn that he has spirit and strength of character, traits that have largely been suppressed by the way he was brought up. Hobbes was adopted; Andy was raised by his natural parents.
  • There is also a theme of blood sacrifice. On one level, this manifests as a selfish urge to kill for a character's own insane needs. On another level, Hobbes, going about his duty, puts his own life on the line to try and rescue a member of the public. Then, Andy risks all, abandoning his habitual selfishness and cowardice, to help.
  • There is hot blood, a passionate, fiery nature, as exemplified by Hobbes, in comparison to cold blooded other characters, especially in their plans to murder.
  • There is the verb 'to blood', meaning to initiate. Hobbes initiates Andy into his world, where not everything is how it appears on the surface. Andy is also 'fresh blood' in Hobbes's circle of friends.
  • And, yes, the title does also encompass some darker meanings, such as bloodbath, blood-letting, and a little blood-curdling!
     

Inspector Hobbes and the Blood is the first in my unhuman series of novels. It is published by The Witcherley Book Company and available in paperback and kindle from Amazon, and other online bookshops.
Amazon.co.uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_14?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=inspector%20hobbes%20and%20the%20blood&sprefix=inspector+hobb%2Caps%2C316&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ainspector%20hobbes%20and%20the%20blood
Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_30?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=inspector%20hobbes%20and%20the%20blood&sprefix=inspector+hobbes+and+the+blood%2Caps%2C210&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ainspector%20hobbes%20and%20the%20blood

Posts on Hobbes
#blog Alan Titchmarsh was my inspiration for writing Inspector Hobbes and the Blood

Event - 7-8 October 2013 on Amazon

The final two days of my KDP Select FREE promotion on the Kindle version of Inspector Hobbes and the Blood.

Event - 31 October 2013 at Writers in the Brewery

I will be reading from, and talking about, Inspector Hobbes and the Blood at the Writers in the Brewery at New Brewery Arts, Brewery Court, Cirencester, Glos., GL7 1JH,  UK on 31 October 2013 at 7:30pm. Doors open 7:00pm. Entry: £4.00. There will also be an open mic event for local writers to read poems, life writing and short stories (register at the door). For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website http://www.newbreweryarts.org.uk/making-a-visit/regular-groups/writers-in-the-brewery
31 October also marks pubnlication day of Inspector Hobbes and the Curse - unhuman II.



Recordings of Inspector Hobbes and the Blood

I talked about and read a couple of short extracts from Inspector Hobbes and the Blood on Corinium Radio in July 2013 (starts 12 minutes in)



Coming soon - Inspector Hobbes and the Curse - 31 October 2013



Inspector Hobbes and the Curse is the second in the series and will be published by The Witcherley Books Company on 31 October 2013. Like 'Blood' in the first title 'Curse' also has a number of interpretations.
Amazon.co.uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=inspector+hobbes+and+the+curse&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ainspector+hobbes+and+the+curse
Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=inspector+hobbes+and+the+curse&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ainspector+hobbes+and+the+curse

Tuesday, 1 October 2013

Jenny Farley and David Clarke at Writers in the Brewery 26th September 2013


Acclaimed poets, David Clarke and Jennie Farley, were the star guests at Writers in the Brewery, which returned after its summer holidays on Thursday 26th September, 2013.


Open Mic

There was a good crowd in, many attracted by our star guests, plus a few local performers as well. The evening kicked off with an 'open mic' session, when local writers presented samples of their work. This time it was mostly poetry, There was some good stuff, and I was particularly impressed with an excellent modern sonnet, 'Rite of Passage' from Derek Healey about early retirement, and a rather powerful piece, 'Don't Shout at Me' read by Suzie White, written by Bob, one of her students, about ageing. I broke the mould by reading a short story, 'Living the Dream', a speculative piece about implanting memories that was cruelly overlooked by the judge of the Gloucestershire Writers Network (GWN) competition for this year's Cheltenhma Festival of Literature. Not that I'm bitter and twisted. Of course not. Anyway, since the GWN event is not being held in the fantastic Spiegeltent this year, I didn't want to win after all. I'm still going along to watch though, as it is a most enjoyable evening, wherever it's held.


Following a break for a drink and a chat, David Clarke and Jenny Farley held the floor. About eight years ago, I took a useful and enjoyable week-long course with Jenny at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and was pleased to she'd recovered from the encounter.

David Clarke and Jennie Farley

David and Jenny's programme was called Counterpoint, and comprised ʻmix ʼn matchʼ poetry exploring the theme of love and relationships. Essentially, Jenny's poems tended towards positive and hopeful, whereas David's were a little more cynical, providing an interesting counterpoint. They worked together rather well and were enjoyed by an appreciative audience.


David Clarkeʼs pamphlet GAUD ʻimmaculately crafted poetry, eloquent andoriginalʼ won the Flarestack Pamphlet Prize, 2012. (Listed on Amazon.co.uk but unfortunately currently unavailable http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gaud-David-Clarke/dp/190648032X)


Jennie Farleyʼs poetry has been widely published and won several national awards. Her collection MASKS AND FEATHERS was launched at the Cheltenham Poetry Festival, 2012

Writers in the Brewery
  
For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website http://www.newbreweryarts.org.uk/making-a-visit/regular-groups/writers-in-the-brewery


Coming up
The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so supporting the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by, creative writing teaching, Dr Rona Laycock. 
- See more at: http://www.newbreweryarts.org.uk/making-a-visit/regular-groups/writers-in-the-brewery#sthash.t6wtHJjR.dpuf


  • 31 October 2013  
    Wilkie Martin

    I will be talking about and reading from my debut novel, Inspector Hobbes and the Blood which is set in the Cotswolds. 31 October also marks publication day, all being well, for my second book Inspector Hobbes and the Curse, the second in the unhuman series. I will introduce you to my small-town community with its quirky and occasionally dangerous inhabitants, and to Inspector Hobbes the 'unhuman' policeman who maintains law and order.
  • 28 November 2013 
    Poetry Factory

    The Poetry Factory is a poetry group featuring Gloucestershire based poets David Clarke, Sharon Larkin, Anna Saunders, Philip Rush, Avril Staple and Chaucer Cameron. Anna Saunders is the director of Cheltenham Poetry Festival. Sharon Larkin is Chairman of Cheltenham Poetry Society, running writing and reading groups, and a full programme of workshops and other events throughout the year. Avril Staple is a poet and musician. Chaucer Cameron is a poet working with multi media.

Previous Writers in the Brewery

Pictures:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wilkiewrites/sets/72157633836920506/
Reviews:

Howard Timms at Writers in the Brewery, 27th June 2013
Moses Wiggins at Writers in the Brewery, 30 May 2013
John Gibbons with Armorel Weston at Writers in the Brewery - 25 April 2013
Writers in the Brewery 29th March 2013 - Rob Palmer
Lesley Saunders at Writers in the Brewery – 28 February 2013

Saturday, 6 July 2013

#blog Alan Titchmarsh was my inspiration for writing Inspector Hobbes and the Blood

I enjoyed my brief appearance on Corinium Radio talking about some of the inspiration for my novel Inspector Hobbes and the Blood (published on 26 July 2013). Here is a little more background on my book's characters.

Alan Titchmarsh as inspiration
The initial inspiration for Inspector Hobbes came from seeing a television programme in which Alan Titchmarsh, made up to look like a Neanderthal, walked through a busy street. If I remember rightly, only one person, a young woman, really noticed him, and stared for a moment. This gave me the idea that Neanderthals, or possibly individuals from some other branch of the human tree, might still exist, living in our midst, generally unremarked. Then, one evening, sometime later, I visited a local video store, where a family renting videos struck me as so strange in their manners, appearance, and speech that it brought the Titchmarsh Neanderthal, and the concept that they are still among us, back to mind.
Shortly afterwards, Inspector Hobbes came to life as a character in a short story. He, concealed behind the façade of a police detective, was not quite human, being of extraordinary strength, and having retained certain animal characteristics and senses. People hearing the story seemed to find the character appealing, so I wrote a couple more, playing around with the character. Although these went reasonably well, I thought they weren't really going anywhere, but that Hobbes might be able to sustain a novel.
And Sherlock Holmes
An early problem was that I found I was unable to get into his mind, in the same way I would be unable to comprehend what is happening in the mind of, say, a dog. Although I could have used a third person narrative form, I thought about the Sherlock Holmes stories, being a fan of them. In these, since Holmes' thought processes are obviously so different to those of normal people, Conan-Doyle used the device of a narrator, Dr Watson, to carry the story. I decided to do something similar, and Andy Caplet became my narrator. Since I needed a reason to get Andy involved with Hobbes, I made him a local reporter. Andy's name came from an old photograph I'd seen of composers Claude Debussy and Andre Caplet together. Debussy was large and hairy, a bit like I imagined Hobbes, whereas Caplet appeared small and insignificant. As the novel developed, Andy, struggling against his many flaws, became the central character.
Mrs Goodfellow, the eccentric, tooth-collecting housekeeper, appeared fully formed, and apparently out of nowhere. She just seemed to be essential, and the sort of woman who would look after and care for an outsider like Hobbes. As for Dregs, Hobbes's big, bad dog, I wasn't sure why he appeared, but knew he was necessary. Even so, it was only as the plot worked itself out that I understood why.
Other characters, particularly the non-human ones, developed from the sort of people Hobbes, would know. After all, if you accept the possibility of one non-human being living in town, it is a small stretch to accept there may be others, even if they are not all the same, and mythic beings may have had some basis in fact. The plot developed from these characters, as well as those Andy knew. I made up the word unhuman to describe Hobbes, rather than using inhuman, which carries connotations of cruelty.

Cotswolds setting

I set the action in and around Sorenchester, a fictional Cotswold town. All the characters and the locations in the book are entirely fictitious, arising from my own warped mind.
At the end of Inspector Hobbes and the Blood, realising there was still potential for stories with Andy, Hobbes, Mrs Goodfellow and Dregs, I began the, now completed, second book in the unhuman series, Inspector Hobbes and the Curse, and am now editing the third in the series.

Available from

Inspector Hobbes and the Blood is published by The Witcherley Book Company on 26 July 2013. It is available in paperback (ISBN: 978-0-9576351-0-4 £7.99) or kindle (ISBN: 978-0-9576351-1-1 £4.99) and is available from amazon, or it can also be ordered from bookshops. As well as amazons worldwide it is being distributed by Adlibris.com, Bertrams, Blackwell, Book Depository, Coutts, Gardners, Mallory International, Paperback Shop, Eden Interactive Ltd., Aphrohead in the UK and worldwide, and by Ingram, Baker & Taylor, Barnes & Noble in the US. It will also be available to createspace resellers (https://www.createspace.com/pub/l/createspacedirect.do?rewrite=true).

Subscribe to my newsletter for updates on my books, or for details of special offers and discount codes http://wilkiemartin.com/newsletter.html.

Tuesday, 2 July 2013

Howard Timms at Writers in the Brewery, 27th June 2013

CHYP

This was another evening at Writers in the Brewery that deviated a little from the norm. It started with a prize giving for the winners of the Cirencester Housing for Young People (CHYP) poetry competition http://chypthecharity.org.uk/. The winner was Phil Kirby, a fine poet who once gave a talk at Writers in the Brewery. 2nd was Ros Lee, and 3rd was Chris Paston.



Open Mic

After the winners read their poems, there were more readings. Jamie Glasspool read a promising extract from his first novel, followed by Guy Hunter, who has his own poetry show on Radio Winchcombe http://www.radiowinchcombe.co.uk , reading a poem about how to predict the future. I was last on before the break, with my short story, The Promised Land, a black comedy about an unfortunate murderer. People seemed to like it.


 Howard Timms


After the customary beer and chat break, during which I won a bottle of wine in the raffle (Hoorah!), Howard Timms www.howardtimms.com took the floor, with a shortened version of his one man show, In Tune with Dementia. This was about his relationship with his mother when she was in a home suffering from dementia. Although it could have been a really depressing story, Howard, acting himself and his mother, managed to make it very funny at times, while not avoiding the genuine sadness. It was cleverly done, and well presented, taking us close to tears at times, before veering towards humour, and heading off into a song - often the way he used to unlock his mother's memory, if only temporarily.

I was impressed by the way he managed to bring in all sorts of memories and family secrets, both comic and sad, leading to a number of sub plots amongst the main theme of losing a mother to a cruel disease.

He will be taking the show up to the Edinburgh festival in August edfringe.com/whats-on/theatre/in-tune-with-dementia . Having experienced it, I reckon he should do well. Good luck, Howard.

Coming up:
The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so supporting the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by, creative writing teaching, Dr Rona Laycock.
  • Writers in the Brewery
    • After a break for the summer Writers in the Brewery returns on Thursday 26 September
        
  • Corinium Radio
    • Winners of the next Write Out Loud writing competition have the opportunity to read or have their work read during this broadcast.
      Saturday 6 July 2013
      15:15 (BST) – Write Out Loud    
    • I will be discussing my new novel Inspector Hobbes and the Blood with Linda Dyson on Corinium Radio
      Friday 5 July 2013
      12:20 (BST) – with Linda Dyson
    • The frequency of the station is usually 87.7fm but won't be confirmed until just before the date. It can also be listened to online through the Corinium Radio website.
       
Writers in the Brewery:

For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website newbreweryarts.org.uk/courses-events-and-groups/join-a-group/writers-in-the-brewery-c-453_312_361.html

Previous relevant blogs:

Moses Wiggins at Writers in the Brewery, 30 May 2013
John Gibbons with Armorel Weston at Writers in the Brewery - 25 April 2013
Writers in the Brewery 29th March 2013 - Rob Palmer
Lesley Saunders at Writers in the Brewery – 28 February 2013

Saturday, 8 June 2013

Moses Wiggins at Writers in the Brewery, 30 May 2013

This was a well-attended event starring Moses Wiggins who are: Nicholas John, who writes the stories and sings, and Keith Thompson http://www.densitymusic.com, who sings and plays red-hot guitar.

Open mic:

For this evening, there was a slight change in format, with the 'open mic' part first. To start with, Jane, a writer of historical romances, told us how, inspired by Rob Palmer's talk at Writers in the Brewery in April, she had put two of her existing books onto Amzon's Kindle Prime, where readers can download books for free for a limited period, and had reached 3407 downloads, reaching no. 8 in the Historical Fiction chart. She recommended using the Ebookbooster service www.ebookbooster.com to publicize the book (for $40). The only downside was that she had only made eight sales, but was hoping to get some good reviews from those who'd downloaded it to give some impetus to the books.

There was only one other writer up for the loacl writers reading their work part of  'open mic', and that writer was me; it felt rather like being the support act. I read my short ghost story, Intersection, which seemed to hold the audience's attention. Thank you to all those who came up afterwards and said how much they had enjoyed it.

Moses Wiggins:



Then after a short interval, and a glass of Muddy Wellies ale, Moses Wiggins took the stage, bringing with them a professional set up, including real microphones, amplifiers, computers, videos and lights; the only thing missing was pyrotechnics, although that might have been a good thing in such a small venue. They performed a new Word Song, a clever blend of story telling, music and video that kept us all thoroughly entertained, despite Keith having severe toothache and being on drugs (how very rock and roll!) to kill the pain. After he'd performed a blues song in the style of Seasick Steve, I dubbed him 'Toothache Thompson', which has a ring to it. Keith's playing and Nick's angsty stories made for a most enjoyable evening.

You can see Keith Thompson band on youtube http://www.youtube.com/user/Densitymusic, he is also a frequent performer at New Brewery Arts Blues Nights and a few of his performances are on NewBreweryArts channel http://www.youtube.com/user/NewBreweryArts.

Nick writes regularly for The Stow Times, check out his short stories on their website http://www.stowtimes.co.uk/archive.php, see his short story 'The Cloth We're Cut From' in the May issue for http://www.stowtimes.co.uk/stow_on_the_wold/issues/Stow_Times_May_2013.pdf, or other stories in earlier issues.

They have a performance coming up at Peppers in Gloucester.

Coming up:

The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so supporting the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by, creative writing teaching, Dr Rona Laycock.

Writers in the Brewery:

For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website newbreweryarts.org.uk/courses-events-and-groups/join-a-group/writers-in-the-brewery-c-453_312_361.html

Previous relevant blogs:

John Gibbons with Armorel Weston at Writers in the Brewery - 25 April 2013
Writers in the Brewery 29th March 2013 - Rob Palmer
Lesley Saunders at Writers in the Brewery – 28 February 2013

Thursday, 2 May 2013

John Gibbons with Armorel Weston at Writers in the Brewery - 25 April 2013

Another enjoyable evening at Writers in the Brewery with poetry and song from John Gibbens, who won the prestigious Eric Gregory Award for poetry at the age of 22, but whose books would not be acceptable to a publisher for another 30 years. Orpheus Ascending, a retrofuture love story, was published by Smokestack Books in March 2012. In the meantime, he has self-published a first fat volume (Collected Poems, Touched Press, 2000) and a poetic study of Bob Dylan (The Nightingale's Code, Touched, 2001), and recorded seven CDs of original songs with his musical partner Armorel Weston.

John read a number of poems influenced by such diverse themes as Tarot, Abbeys, cathedrals and museums, the Beatles, Bob Marley, nosalgia. I particularly enjoyed the witty word play of Alpha-Beatles. 

In the next section, he played guitar while Armorel sang a selection of 60s influenced songs with flavours of folk and jazz. Armorel has a great voice, though I could have done without the scat singing at the end of the songs. In my opinion, although it showed off the range of her voice, there is no excuse. Admitedly, I never like scat, no matter who sings it.
John's books are available on Amazon and include:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/John-Gibbens/e/B001KCE48Q/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1367526286&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Collected-Poems-John-Gibbens/dp/0953915301/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367526286&sr=1-3&keywords=John+Gibbens


See Amorel's also sings with the group The Children (http://www.touched.co.uk/phono/children.html), see her website http://www.touched.co.uk/phono/armorelweston.html and her latest CD http://www.touched.co.uk/phono/grace/grace.html where you can find a sample song.

Open Mic:

After the interval, Nick John, who currently writes short stories for the Stow Times, read his latest one, a rather excellent piece about not judging someone on their appearance. We then had a short poem from Jacky, with fine imagery, and a thought-provoking tale from Gill Garret.

Coming up:

The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so please also support the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by, creative writing teaching, Dr Rona Laycock.  
  • Thursday 27 June 2013 - Howard Timms will perform his solo play Let the Lady Sing. He is Playwriter at Chicago Dramatists, member of the Cheltenham Everyman Writers Lab and Cheltenham Playhouse Theatre Co, co-founder of Playhouse New Drama. Find out more about Howard on the Playhouse New Drama site howardtimmswritesite.com/

For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website newbreweryarts.org.uk/courses-events-and-groups/join-a-group/writers-in-the-brewery-c-453_312_361.html

Previous relevant blogs: 

Writers in the Brewery 29th March 2013 - Rob Palmer
Lesley Saunders at Writers in the Brewery – 28 February 2013

 

Sunday, 31 March 2013

Writers in the Brewery 29th March 2013 - Rob Palmer

Rob Palmer (robpalmer.com), a writer and e-publisher, gave an interesting and inspiring talk on how to write and self-publish best-selling books. Starting by pointing out successful authors such as J.A.Konrath, Amanda Hocking and Barry Eisler, who have done it on their own, he gave us the following facts to ponder. Following the traditional publishing plan, nets authors, on average, about 7% of revenue, whereas a self-publisher of an e-book will net about 70% of revenue. E-books are a growing, and already large, market, which traditional publishers have so far failed to come to terms with. A self-published e-book will never go out of print on a publisher's whim and can provide a long-term income stream.

Rob recommended getting started by using Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) (kdp.amazon.com)which allows writers to self-publish their books and make them available on Kindle, iPad, iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Mac, and PC. Publishing is simple and can be done in 12 hours. According to Rob, it is worth concentrating on Amazon, which is responsible for 90-95% of sales, and KDP is simpler to use than other systems. A writer needs to get onto KDP, submit the book in Word format, get a good cover designed, add the book as a new title and submit it. The system works equally well for fiction and non-fiction books
.
Rob suggested that fiction books often sell well if they are part of a series. A writer can sell the first one relatively cheaply, in the expectation that readers will want to read further books, which can be more expensive. However, as readers tend to equate price with quality, books should not be too cheap. It is good practice to ensure the formatting is correct and that the book has been proof-read. Then it needs a compelling product description, a strong hook in the first chapter or two, a great, Kindle friendly, cover (square with colour and legible, attention-grabbing, title etc). After that it is a case of getting Amazon recommendations, and promoting the book.

In Rob's experience, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google, and YouTube are not very effective. However the KDP Select Programme is, as it leads to better Amazon ratings. Other sites which are of value are Author Central (authorcentral.amazon.co.uk), Goodreads (goodreads.com), WeRead (weread.com) and Shelfari (shelfari.com).

Beyond e-books, Rob suggested CreateSpace (createspace.com) as a good and simple method of printing books on demand. In this case, print rights, translation rights and media rights stay with the author.

Other useful sites include digitalbookworld.com, jakonrath.com and novelpublicity.com.
 
Rob has a number of books (for self help and publishing guides, see amazon.co.uk/Rob-Palmer/e/B007ZWDUBW), including:
 
 
No More Rejections! How To Write and Publish Your Own Fiction Profitably, Quickly and Easily...and Become a Bestselling Author Almost Overnight (How To Make Money With eBooks) amazon.co.uk/Rejections-Profitably-Easily-Bestselling-ebook/dp/B006Z22B8Q/ref=la_B007ZWDUBW_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364762442&sr=1-7


How to Make Quick and Easy Money With eBooks - Even If You Can't Write and Can't Spell amazon.co.uk/Make-Quick-Money-eBooks-ebook/dp/B006WDIVCI/ref=la_B007ZWDUBW_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364762507&sr=1-8

He also has a novel The Lovers from Hell, available from Amazon amazon.co.uk/The-Lover-Hell-Murder-ebook/dp/B00ARJOGBI, or from his website robpalmer.com/books/.
 
 

Open mic:

After we all had time to get a hot drink (it was a freezing night), the second part of the evening was an open mic with David Bailey (actor and writer), Howard Timms (writer and performer) and me reading, when our teeth stopped chattering long enough.
 
Coming up: 

The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so please also support the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by, creative writing teaching, Dr Rona Laycock.
  • Thursday 25 April 2013 - Poets, artists and musicians John Gibbens and Armorel Weston, followed by open mic. Check them out on myspace myspace.com/thechildrenofalbion. Find out more about Armorel at  touched.co.uk/phono/armorelweston.html and more from John's collaboration with Armorel as The Children touched.co.uk/phono/children.html.
  • Thursday 30 May 2013 - 30 minute creative wriing workshop, followed by an open mic. 
     
  • Thursday 27 June 2013 - Howard Timms will perform his solo play Let the Lady Sing. He is Playwriter at Chicago Dramatists, member of the Cheltenham Everyman Writers Lab and Cheltenham Playhouse Theatre Co, co-founder of Playhouse New Drama.Find out more about Howard on the Playhouse New Drama site howardtimmswritesite.com/

For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website newbreweryarts.org.uk/courses-events-and-groups/join-a-group/writers-in-the-brewery-c-453_312_361.html

And don't forget it is World Book Night soon on 23 April 2013 worldbooknight.org/

Friday, 8 March 2013

Lesley Saunders at Writers in the Brewery – 28 February 2013

It's been quite a while since my last post, but with the Writers in the Brewery now restarted after its winter layoff it is an excellent point to begin again.

Writers in the Brewery 2013 opened with the excellent Lesley Saunders, a writer and poet, unusual in being well acquainted with history and science.


Lesley reminisced about a residency at Acton Court, near Bristol, which Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn visited in May 1535; Anne was beheaded within a year. Acton Court and its associations proved to be an evocative place, inspiring Lesley to write a number of thought–provoking, enjoyable poems about such themes as music and dance, the passing on of messages in prayer books, cravings during pregnancy for rampions (a type of wild flower, prized in Tudor times for its spinach-like leaves, and tasty roots), and the religious turmoil of those days. There were also a number of strong poems inspired by museums and scientific themes, such as technology, medicine, germ theory and astronomy.



After a break, I read my short story: A Question of Time, Liz Carew read one of her evocative poems, and Lesley engaged us in conversation.

For me, it was an enjoyable, inspiring evening, helped along by a couple of bottles of Muddy Wellies ale. It was only a shame how few from Cirencester turned up for such an excellent poet and speaker, though the audience was boosted by some who'd come from the Forest of Dean.

Lesley's book of poetry Cloud Camera is available from amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cloud-Camera-Lesley-Saunders/dp/1901677818/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362762521&sr=1-3, where she also has some books on education.
Find out more about Lesley at her website http://www.lesleysaunders.org.uk/ 

Let me know what you thought.


Coming up:

The next Writers in the Brewery events are on the last Thiursday of each month, doors open 7pm for a 7:30pm start and 9:00pm finish. Price £4, which goes to the venue, New Brewery Arts (as does the bar money), so please also support the raffle which helps with the expenses of the speakers/performers. Events are organized by Dr Rona Laycock.

  • Thursday 28 March 2013 - 30 minute creative writing workshop, followed by an open mic
  • Thursday 25 April 2013 - Poets, artists and musicians John Gibbens and Armorel Weston, followed by open mic. Check them out on myspace http://www.myspace.com/thechildrenofalbion. Find out more about Armorel at  http://www.touched.co.uk/phono/armorelweston.html and more from John's collaboration with Armorel as The Children http://www.touched.co.uk/phono/children.html.
  • Thursday 30 May 2013 - 30 minute creative writing workshop, followed by an open mic
  • Thursday 27 June 2013 - Howard Timms will perform his solo play Let the Lady Sing. He is Playwriter at Chicago Dramatists, member of the Cheltenham Everyman Writers Lab and Cheltenham Playhouse Theatre Co, co-founder of Playhouse New Drama.Find out more about Howard on the Playhouse New Drama site http://howardtimmswritesite.com/
For more about Writers in the Brewery see the New Brewery Arts website http://www.newbreweryarts.org.uk/courses-events-and-groups/join-a-group/writers-in-the-brewery-c-453_312_361.html

And don't forget it is World Book Night soon 23 April 2012 http://www.worldbooknight.org/


My Related Postings:

Susan Gibbs at Writers in the Brewery, 31 March 2011
World Book Night at New Brewery Arts - Saturday 5 March 2011